The Watercolors of TONY VEVERS

20 March – 8 May, 2009

On Friday, 20 March 2009 THE WATERCOLORS OF TONY VEVERS, an exhibition of landscape-inspired abstractions by Tony Vevers from the 1950s, will open at ACME Fine Art, Boston. A reception from six to eight on Friday evening (the 20th) will mark the opening. The exhibition will be on view through 8 May.

Upon emigrating from England to the United States in 1940 at the age of fourteen, Tony Vevers was impressed by the sprawling lushness of the American landscape. This connection to and appreciation of the American landscape quickly formed a theme in Vevers’ artistic pursuits, a theme that continued throughout his lengthy career as an artist and educator. Vevers was surrounded by art as a boy, and he was eager to undertake the serious study of painting and drawing as soon as he could. He welcomed the opportunity to do so at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville CT, where he particularly enjoyed painting the landscape en-plein-air. In 1946 Vevers went on to study at Yale University where he earned his BA degree in Drawing and Painting in1950.

Following graduation from Yale Vevers spent time traveling in Italy. While there his focus was on abstracting the landscape in oil paintings and in watercolors. Of this period Vevers said, “When I first got there I tried to do a more abstract figuration. By the end of my stay, I was taken with the idea of working abstractly through nature, something I’ve always done.”

Upon his return to the US, Vevers attended the Hans Hofmann School in New York. While many of his colleagues’ work adopted a more distinctly non-objective, abstract expressionist style, Vevers work consistently maintained a connection to nature. In fact, by 1955 Vevers was beginning to incorporate the human figure into his work. This was at a time when such a thing was almost taboo among the art world’s avant-garde elite.

The watercolors that will be featured in ACME Fine Art’s upcoming exhibition include two early Italian landscapes, and a group of four exceptional shoreline-inspired abstractions painted in Provincetown from 1958. This was a period that was particularly rich both with respect to the history of the arts in Provincetown but also in Vevers’ own development as an artist. At that time he was exhibiting his work at a relatively small gallery known as the Sun Gallery on Commercial Street in Provincetown. His colleagues in the gallery were such artists as: Jan Muller, Bob Thompson, Lester Johnson and Red Grooms, and all were breaking new ground by bringing the “subject” back to modern art.

Vevers exhibited at many notable institutions throughout her career, including Indianapolis Art League, IA; Boston University Art Gallery; Cape Museum of Fine Arts; Copenhagen City Gallery, Denmark; Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, GA; Guildhall Museum, East Hampton, NY; and the Indiana State Museum, Indianapolis, IA. Vevers’ work is represented in the permanent collections of the Isaac Delgardo Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA; the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA; Farleigh-Dickinson University, NJ; Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Walter Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, VA; Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC; Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.

ACME Fine Art and Design is located at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday.

STEPHEN PACE: EARLY WORK

20 March – 8 May, 2009

STEPHEN PACE: EARLY WORK, ACME Fine Art’s second solo exhibition of Stephen Pace’s abstract expressionist works, will open on 20 March 2009. This exhibition will focus on watercolors and oil paintings that were created between 1950 to 1955. This was an important developmental period for Pace, one that traces his growth from student at the Hans Hofmann School to accomplished member of the New York School. A reception from six to eight on Friday evening (the 20th) will mark the opening. The exhibition will run through 8 May. Exhibition catalogues are available by contacting the gallery.

Although today he is widely recognized for his contemporary figurative paintings and watercolors, Stephen Pace made his name in the art world in the 1950s and early 1960s for his non-objective Abstract Expressionist canvases. During this period Pace found representation at the Howard Wise Gallery in New York, and Wise mounted five solo exhibitions of Pace’s work over the course of two decades. His work was also included in group exhibitions at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the Museum of Modern Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), the Art Institute of Chicago, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art (four times) during this period.

Following military service in World War II, Pace came to New York and studied with the man who is widely recognized as one of the 20th century’s most important and influential art educators, Hans Hofmann. As a post-war student of Hofmann, Pace is today labeled a second generation Abstract Expressionist; however, throughout the 1950s during the heyday of the Abstract Expressionist movement, Pace’s contemporary work was exhibited along side the most respected of the first generation artists. Hans Hofmann had high regard for Pace, and in a LOOK magazine story from 1959 he described Pace as an “original talent.” In connection with an exhibition of paintings by Pace at the Walker Art Center in 1961 Hofmann said that Pace was a “great contemporary talent… with great plastic imagination and immense vitality and inventiveness in the realm of color.”

The focus of ACME Fine Art’s upcoming exhibition of Stephen Pace’s non-representational work will be the paintings produced between 1950 and 1955. The idea is to trace Pace’s exploration and development from the point of interface with maestro Hofmann through this highly productive five-year period, which culminated in the establishment of his mature, unique, expressionist voice. As it still can be seen today in his contemporary canvases, this work is at once lyrical, and poetic; however, these early paintings demonstrate a fearless vigor and bold masculinity that is uniquely both compelling and provocative.

Exhibition catalogues are available upon request.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.

ACME Fine Art and Design is located at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday.